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Latest Headlines

Latest Headlines

HLC's Mary Grealy: Interoperability mandate in next SGR bill wouldn't surprise me

In discussing the bevy of hurdles impeding the path to interoperability in healthcare at the Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange's annual fall conference this week, Mary Grealy, president of the Healthcare Leadership Council, which represents chief executives from healthcare companies and organizations nationwide, outlined several steps and principles necessary to guide that transition.

Leading by example: Patient experience the Cleveland Clinic way

In an exclusive interview, Cleveland Clinic Chief Experience Officer James Merlino, M.D. explains what led to his personal philosophy of patient experience and how the organization implemented strategies to become a leader in patient satisfaction.

Karen DeSalvo: Interoperability won't come easy

At the Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange's annual fall conference in Reston, Virginia on Tuesday, National Coordinator for Health IT Karen DeSalvo reiterated the challenges and goals associated with implementing ubiquitous interoperability throughout the healthcare industry.

Improving care transitions for pediatric asthma patients

Ivor Horn, M.D., an emergency medical physician at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., has her sights set on creating truly patient-centered technology with mobile solutions. She and fellow physicians at Children's are focusing on at-risk children and adolescents with asthma--and the stress and confusion that caring for those children that can cause parents.

More patients open to primary care offered by physician assistants

As the healthcare industry seeks to find ways to address the primary care shortage, a recent nationwide survey finds that patients are more open to care provided by physician assistants.  FierceHealthcare spoke to John McGinnity, president of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, about the profession and how it is set to fill the gaps in healthcare today. 

Mergers and Acquisitions: 3 steps to integrate health IT systems

As the healthcare industry continues to consolidate, leading chief information officers (CIOs) find that developing a template or common approach to marrying disparate systems saves time and minimizes headaches.

Ebola: Legal implications for hospitals, healthcare workers

To find out the legal implications Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas may face in the wake of the latest Ebola-related incidents--and the legal rights of the medical workers who face the greatest risk as they care for patients with the illness-- FierceHealthcare spoke with Karen Evans, R.N., J.D., an attorney with the Johnnie Cochran Law Firm in the District of Columbia.

CHIME, HL7 applaud ONC road map, JASON task force recommendations

Health industry groups expressed optimism following the Oct. 15 meeting of the federal government's Health IT Policy and Standards committees to discuss a draft interoperability road map unveiled by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT. In particular, the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives and Health Level Seven International (HL7) viewed the road map as step in the right direction. 

Hospitals, physicians fight for women's equity in healthcare research, delivery

In an exclusive interview with FierceHealthcare, KIimberly Skelding, M.D., an interventional cardiologist at Geisinger Health System based in Danville, Pennsylvania, discusses efforts by hospitals and physicians around the country to improve equity in healthcare research and delivery.

Cardiac imaging: Educating physicians and empowering patients

Today, cardiac imaging accounts for about 40 percent of patient radiology exposure, and there have been concerns expressed that many cardiologists haven't been fully aware of the risks associated with ionizing radiation and cardiac imaging. In this week's issue of  FierceMedicalImaging  we report on research that further illustrates the impact cardiac imaging can have on patient radiation exposure. The study, published in the  Annals of Internal Medicine, found that the overuse of cardiac stress testing over the course of nearly two decades has resulted in the performance of about 1 million unnecessary tests (most of them conduced with imaging) at a cost of about half a billion dollars.